sMAartblog

Rejecting the Derogatory ‘Feminine’

Posted on: 05/01/2010


What happens to language and the way women are addressed when they start to occupy positions of responsibility? Well, it depends on the language. In Italian, most women prefer the masculine titles, because the feminine version (when it exists) is considered ludicrous, even derogatory.

In Spanish, a related language, this is different. So, is this a grammatical issue or a social one?

“The problem is not only Italian machoism, but the lack of awareness and directives as to how to address women correctly,” says Angelica Mucchi-Faina, psychology professor at the Perugia University.
In Italian, most women prefer the masculine titles, because the feminine version (when it exists) is considered ludicrous, even derogatory.

In Spanish, a related language, this is different. So, is this a grammatical issue or a social one?

“The problem is not only Italian machoism, but the lack of awareness and directives as to how to address women correctly,” says Angelica Mucchi-Faina, psychology professor at the Perugia University.

“A language is the mirror of its society. Until a few decades, all positions of power or public responsibility were occupied exclusively by men. So those roles were defined ‘in masculine’,” says Mucchi-Faina.

Modern English lacks grammatical gender, whereas Indo-European languages, including Italian and Spanish, can distinguish between masculine and feminine.

“The linguistic discrimination against women is realised through multiple conduits,” says José Luis Aliaga Jiménez, professor in Linguistics of the Universidad de Zaragoza. “The configuration and functioning of grammatical gender in languages like Spanish and Italian is not the most important, but it is the one with deepest symbolic reach.”

When it comes to titles of importance, in Italian, you find yourself reading about “il ministro Mara Carfagna” – even if Carfagna, the minister of equality, is a woman. In contrast, in Spanish there is no option but ‘ministra’, ending in the feminine ‘a’.

Says Mucchi-Faina, “Most countries issued recommendations to avoid sexism when addressing women. Also in Italy, in 1986, the Presidency issued similar recommendations. But instead of being taken seriously and implemented, they were an object of jokes, and eventually forgotten.”

“Contrary to what has happened in other countries, in Italy there is no general rule and everyone can pick and choose whether to use neologisms like ‘ministra’ or the traditional ‘ministro’ for women,” says Mucchi-Faina.

Politician Luisa Capelli, from L’Italia dei valori party (The Italy of Values), thinks that “leaving behind the supposed universal neutrality of the masculine form is an essential passage so that the feminine experience gets respect.”

“It is not true that these feminine forms (for positions of power) do not exist in Italian: there are plenty of examples from feminists, linguists and semiologists who have made a number of proposals,” says Capelli. “You can say ‘avvocata’ (lawyer) and ‘ministra’, but nobody does. Although many of us use those words, we are ignored. To change the symbolic order is hard work that requires a consensus based on the profound convictions of people.”

Sexism in language was identified as a global problem during the first world conference on the status of women, celebrated in Mexico in 1975. Many proposals and directives followed. In 1989, UNESCO issued the booklet Guidelines on Non-Sexist Language, aiming at helping “authors and editors avoid writing in a manner that reinforces questionable attitudes and assumptions about people and sex roles.”

Read more: http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=49824

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